| | | | |

Cajun Boudin Balls Recipe (How to Make From Scratch)

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our disclosure policy.

This boudin balls recipe features a savory blend of pork, chicken, and rice. They are coated in crispy Panko breadcrumbs and deep-fried to perfection. A taste of authentic Cajun flavor that’s sure to delight your taste buds!

Boudin balls on a plate with a bottle of hot sauce and a red napkin.

For Black History Month we teamed up with fellow Black food bloggers to bring you 28 mouthwatering recipes throughout February.

Straight from Louisiana, boudin balls showcase the diversity of Cajun cooking. In this recipe, we make a homemade boudin sausage blend of pork, chicken, and rice rolled into bite-sized balls. We then coat the balls in crunchy Panko breadcrumbs. You can also use store-bought boudin

After making this recipe many times for friends and family, we can confidently say that there’s no better way to enjoy this authentic Cajun boudin balls recipe at home. The first bite will transport you to the cozy kitchens of the bayou, where this cherished dish has been a favorite for ages. With its mix of tradition, history, and downright deliciousness, this finger food recipe is a must try!

It’s the perfect appetizer for game day! For an extra kick, don’t forget the hot sauce and remoulade sauce – they help to enhance the bold flavors of this bayou classic!

What is Boudin?

Boudin is a type of pork sausage (the literal translation is “sausage”) that is popular in Louisiana, particularly in Cajun cuisine. It is typically made from a mixture of cooked and seasoned ground pork meat, rice, and Cajun seasoning, and vegetables like green onion, celery, and bell pepper. The mixture is often encased in a sausage casing, but it can also be removed from the casing and used in various dishes.

What are boudin balls?

Boudin balls are Cajun boudin sausage that’s been removed from the casing, rolled into a meatball shape, breaded, and deep-fried. They are popular throughout Acadiana (aka Cajun country) and Louisiana. Other variations of boudin balls include boudin egg rolls, crawfish balls, shrimp balls, and crab balls.

Where to Buy a Boudin Sausage Link

Store-bought boudin provides a time-saving alternative to making it yourself. However, if you live outside of Louisiana you may have a hard time finding it. However, we recommend Tony’s Seafood. They will overnight authentic Louisiana boudin to your house. It’s the best thing ever!

Note: To learn more about the interesting history of boudin, check out NPR’s article on sausage, slavery, and rebellion in the Caribbean and Garden & Gun’s article on the Caribbean’s influence on Creole cuisine.

A close-up of several Cajun boudin balls on a light background.

Ingredients For Homemade Boudin

  • 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 pound chicken livers, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 celery rib, diced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 jalapenos, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 1 medium poblano pepper, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 2 green onions, chopped

Boudin Balls

  • 3 cups panko breadcrumbs
  • vegetable oil, for frying

Note: If you are using store-bought boudin sausage, skip down to “How to Make Boudin Balls”.

Recipe Variations

  • Seasoning: Instead of making your own spice blend, use store-bought Cajun seasoning.
  • Seafood Boudin: Experiment with seafood by substituting the pork and chicken liver with shrimp, crab, or crawfish.
  • Heat: Adjust the spiciness by adding more or less cayenne pepper and jalapeños to suit your taste.
  • Gluten-Free: If you have dietary restrictions, use gluten-free breadcrumbs for coating the balls.
  • Pre-made Boudin: There’s no shame in using store-bought. If you live outside of Louisiana you may have a hard time finding it, however, we recommend Tony’s Seafood. They will overnight authentic Louisiana boudin to your house. 

Special Equipment For Sausage Making

In order to make homemade boudin sausage, it is highly recommended that you use a meat grinder. However, if you don’t have access to this special equipment, here are a few other options:

  • Option 1: If you own a KitchenAid stand mixer, they sell a grinder attachment you can buy separately.
  • Option 2: Use a knife to finely chop the meat mixture.
  • Option 3: Buy store-bought sausage. So, this is technically cheating because you’re not making the sausage yourself, but if all else fails, you can make this recipe with pre-made boudin sausage.

Recipe Tips & Tricks

  • Chill the Mixture: Chilling the mixture in the refrigerator or freezer helps it firm up and makes it easier to shape into balls.
  • Panko Breadcrumbs: Panko breadcrumbs provide a crispy coating. You can also use regular breadcrumbs or even crushed crackers for a different texture.
  • Cooking Oil: Use a neutral cooking oil like canola or vegetable oil for frying. Make sure the oil is hot enough (375°F/191°C) before adding the balls for frying.
  • Frying Batches: Fry the balls in batches to avoid overcrowding the frying pan. Overcrowding can lower the oil temperature and make the balls greasy.
  • Dipping Sauce: Serve the boudin balls with your favorite dipping sauce, such as remoulade or hot sauce for added flavor.

How to Make Boudin Sausage

  1. Toss pork, chicken, celery, onion, garlic, peppers, spices, seasonings, and dried herbs in a bowl. To marinate, let it sit for at least 8 hours covered, in the refrigerator (recommended, but not required). 
  2. Transfer the meat mixture to a large pot. Cover it with water and bring to a boil. Let it simmer for about two hours. After cooking, save the liquid from the pot – you’ll use it later.
  3. Remove the pork, chicken, celery, onion, and peppers from the pot and set them aside. While the mixture cools down, set up your meat grinder (or use one of the alternatives mentioned earlier in the Special Equipment & Tools section).
  4. Grind the meat and vegetable mixture, then transfer the to a large bowl or deep metal pan. Mix in the cooked rice, parsley, and green onions using your hands.
  5. Gradually pour about 3 to 4 cups of the saved cooking liquid into the mixture, adding just enough to achieve the right texture (see picture below for reference).
A homemade Cajun boudin sausage recipe mixture in a deep metal pan.

How to Make Boudin Balls

Note: If you are using store-bought boudin sausage, remove the sausage from the casings first before you roll it into balls.

  1. Scoop about 1/4 to 1/2 cup of the boudin into your hand. Roll it into a ball about the size of a golf ball, or slightly larger, making sure to pack it tightly.
  2. Then, roll the balls in Panko breadcrumbs until they are well coated.
  3. Place the coated balls on a parchment or foil-lined baking sheet. Transfer it to the refrigerator for about 30 minutes to an hour, or in the freezer for up to 15 minutes. This helps the balls keep their shape during cooking.
  4. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 375°F (191°C). Cook the boudin balls in hot oil in batches to avoid overcrowding. Each batch will take just a couple of minutes to turn golden brown and crispy.
  5. After frying, remove the balls from the oil. Place them on a paper towel-lined plate or a wire rack to drain excess oil.
  6. Serve the hot boudin balls with your favorite dipping sauce. Enjoy!

What to Serve with Boudin Balls

Boudin balls are served hot with dipping sauces like hot sauce, remoulade, or spicy mayo. It’s a great appetizer or party food that can be served with other Creole and Cajun food:

  • Boudin Egg Rolls: Boudin egg rolls are a fusion of traditional egg rolls and Cajun boudin sausage, featuring a crispy wrapper filled with a flavorful boudin mixture.
  • Crab Cake Egg Rolls with Crawfish and Shrimp: These egg rolls combine the richness of crab cakes with the succulence of crawfish and shrimp, all rolled up in a crispy shell for delicious Cajun appetizers.
  • Slow Cooker Red Beans and Rice: A classic Louisiana Creole dish made with red kidney beans, spices, and served over steamed rice, offering a comforting and hearty meal.
  • Authentic Louisiana Red Beans and Rice: Red kidney beans, smoked ham hock, andouille sausage, bay leaves, bell pepper, celery, and onion are cooked with Creole spices and served with white rice.
  • Crawfish Étouffée: Crawfish étouffée is a Cajun and Creole specialty, featuring tender crawfish tails smothered in a rich, savory, and spicy roux-based sauce, typically served over rice for a taste of Louisiana cuisine.

How to Store and Reheat Boudin Balls

  1. Cool: Allow the balls to cool to room temperature before storing them. This helps prevent condensation, which can make them soggy.
  2. Refrigerate: Store boudin balls in an airtight container or zip-top bag in the refrigerator. Place a layer of parchment paper or wax paper between the layers to prevent them from sticking together.
  3. Label: If you’re storing them for an extended period, label the container with the date to keep track of freshness.

Reheating instructions

  • Oven: Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C). Place boudin balls on a baking sheet, leaving some space between them. Bake for about 10-15 minutes or until they are heated through and crispy.
  • Air Fryer Method: Preheat your air fryer to 350°F (175°C). Arrange boudin balls in a single layer in the air fryer basket. Heat for 5-8 minutes or until they are hot and crispy.
  • Microwave: While not the best for maintaining crispiness, the microwave is a quick option. Place balls on a microwave-safe plate and heat in 20-30 second intervals until warmed through.

FAQ

Can I make the boudin mixture ahead of time?

Yes, the boudin sausage mixture is meant to be prepared a day in advance. Keep it in the refrigerator until you’re ready to grind and/or shape and fry the balls.

Can I freeze boudin balls?

Absolutely, you can freeze uncooked boudin balls. Place them on a baking sheet in a single layer in the freezer until they’re firm, then transfer to a freezer-safe container. When ready to cook, you can fry them directly from frozen.

How do I know when the boudin balls are done frying?

They are done when they are golden brown and heated through. You can use a kitchen thermometer to check the internal temperature, which should reach 165°F (74°C).

More Black History Month Recipes

We hope you enjoy this boudin balls recipe as much as we do! Don’t forget to check out these other amazing Black History Month recipes from Black food bloggers around the world.

Beautiful Eats & Things | Okra, Corn, & Tomato Chicken Stew

Beyond The Bayou Blog | Mackerel Balls With Biscuits & Cane Syrup

B Sugar Mama | Red Beans and Rice

Butter Be Ready | Caribbean-Curry Goat with Rice and Peas

D.M.R. Fine Foods | Spice Roasted Chicken

Dash of Jazz | Soul Food Power Bowl

Dish it with Tisha | Jamaican Curry Chicken

Domestic Dee | Chicken Sliders

Eat.Drink.Frolic. | Bourbon + sweet potato pie

First and Full | Homemade Peach Pie

Food Fidelity  | Nashville Hot Shrimp Sandwich

Food is Love Made Edible | Smothered Okra with Chicken and Smoked Sausage

Immaculate Bites | Pimento Cheese

Kaluhi’s Kitchen | Pilipili & Rosemary marinated mbuzi choma with Kachumbari

Kenneth Temple | Chicken & Sausage Gumbo

Marisa Moore Nutrition | Sweet and Spicy Roasted Cabbage

Meiko And The Dish | Hot Buttered Rum Biscuits

My Life Runs On Food | Southern Style Caesar Salad

Rosalynn Daniels | Osso Bucco

Savory Thoughts | Haitian Patty

Simply LaKita | Fried Okra

Sweet Tea & Thyme | Spiced Peach Shortcakes

That Girl Cooks Healthy | Scotch Bonnet Pepper Sauce

The Hungry Hutch | Cornbread Dressing

The Seasoning Bottle | Guava Short Ribs

Whisk It Real Gud | Banana Bread

Summary

These boudin balls are made with a flavorful mix of pork, chicken, and rice, coated in crunchy breadcrumbs, and fried till they’re just right. You’ve got to give it a try! If you prefer a quicker option, you can buy premade boudin sausage at your local store to simplify the recipe.

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
A close-up of several Cajun boudin balls on a light background.

Boudin Balls Recipe

  • Author: cooks with soul
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Marinate (Optional): 8 hours
  • Cook Time: 2 hours
  • Total Time: 3 hours
  • Yield: 40 boudin balls 1x
  • Category: appetizer
  • Method: deep frying
  • Cuisine: cajun

Description

This Boudin Balls recipe features pork, chicken, and rice rolled in crispy Panko breadcrumbs and deep-fried! An authentic Louisiana recipe inspired by one of Cajun country’s most famous dishes.


Ingredients

Scale

Homemade Boudin Sausage

  • 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 pound chicken liver, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 celery rib, diced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 jalapenos, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 1 medium poblano pepper, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 2 green onions, chopped

Boudin Balls:

  • 3 cups panko breadcrumbs
  • vegetable oil, for frying

Instructions

  1. Make the boudin sausage mixture: Combine the pork, chicken liver, celery, onion, garlic, peppers, spices, seasonings, and dried herbs. To marinate, let the mixture sit for at least 8 hours covered, in the refrigerator (recommended, but not required). 
  2. Dump everything in a large stock pot and cover with water by 2 inches. Bring water to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the meat is tender, about 1 hour and 45 minutes.
  3. Remove the stock pot from the stove and strain, reserving the cooking liquid. Allow it to cool slightly, then put the mixture through a meat grinder set on the coarse grind setting. 
  4. Place the ground mixture in a bowl or deep metal pan. Mix in the cooked rice, parsley, green onions, and about 3 1/2 cups of the reserved cooking liquid. Continue mixing until it all comes together, about 5 minutes, adding more cooking liquid as needed. 
  5. Make the boudin balls: Shape the boudin mixture into balls, approximately the size of a golf ball or slightly larger. Roll each ball in the Panko breadcrumbs and place on a baking sheet. 
  6. Place the sheet pan in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes to an hour.
  7. Heat vegetable oil in a fryer to 375 F degrees. Carefully drop boudin balls in the oil in a single layer, being careful not to crowd or overlap. Fry in batches until golden brown and heated through, about 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer boudin balls to a paper towel-lined plate to drain oil.

Notes

This recipe makes a large batch of boudin sausage. If you don’t want to cook it all at once, you can freeze it.

Vacuum sealing provides the longest shelf life and helps prevent the boudin from freezer burn, oxidation, etc. We recommend using the frozen sausage within 2 months. When thawing, set it in the refrigerator and use it within 2 to 3 days.

Keywords: boudin balls, boudin sausage, boudin, louisiana boudin, sausage

4 Comments

  1. I love boudin sausage, but have never made boudin balls until this recipe. They were so good that I made a double batch for the party I was hosting the next day as I knew people would run through them. I was right! Thanks for another great recipe!

  2. I’ve enjoyed boudin balls at many cajun restaurants, but never had I thought to make my own. These were so good and easy to make. Can’t wait to make them again!

  3. We love boudin balls in Houston! This was my first attempt making boudin balls at home and your recipe did not disappoint. Thank you for making it so easy! And everybody gobbled them up!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe rating 5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.